Welcome to Charlotte's Readers. Sacred Passion is God's Idea,

Romance is vital in marriage. I married in 1962 and began to mentor Mothers of Preschoolers in 1994.. Every year since I began, my groups insist I do my "sex talk," but it is more than that. Being in right relationship with God, attending a vibrant and growing community of believers, choosing to forgive, to respect, and understanding submission is not surrender of self, all goes into the package that makes up a healthy marriage. I want to share it with you.

The blogs and mentor’s moments from those years are free. You are welcome to use them, share them, but they are copyrighted, and I would appreciate it if you cited charlottesreaders.com. God bless you. 

Mentor's Moments


Devotionals


Books


Newest Post

Legacy
Tuesday, January 19, 2016
Charlotte S. Snead

Last week we visited our son and his family. We made the nine hour drive to Nashville from our home in two days, pulling in about 3 in the afternoon. Before I got the car door open, I heard our three year old hollering, “Grammy, Grammy, Grammy! Grammy’s here!” and my heart rejoiced. I told my husband, “Do you hear the music? That is music to my ears.”

When they moved last summer, they changed their former four hour drive to a nine hour drive, but it was a wonderful opportunity for them—a promotion, greater salary, more responsibility. We encouraged them heartily to make the move, despite the greater difficulty in getting to see their boys. The older one, who is three, was our enthusiastic greeter. The younger one, eighteen months, was slower to warm up, but we devoted ourselves to giving him time to be reacquainted. We stored up hugs and story times and vowed to make the trip often, because it is important for grandchildren to know their legacy, to feel a part of a heritage greater than their immediate family.

Whenever we visit the grandchildren, and we have nine now, they want to hear family stories about when their parents were little. They know many of them (“Tell us about when Daddy set the forest on fire,” or, “Tell us about Dad’s pet duck.” Or the snake in the hen house or . . . .) And we connect them to their family history.

This is an important part of grand-parenting—beyond the unconditional love, we provide a legacy

 

Recent Posts

Legacy
Tuesday, January 19, 2016
Charlotte S. Snead

Last week we visited our son and his family. We made the nine hour drive to Nashville from our home in two days, pulling in about 3 in the afternoon. Before I got the car door open, I heard our three year old hollering, “Grammy, Grammy, Grammy! Grammy’s here!” and my heart rejoiced. I told my husband, “Do you hear the music? That is music to my ears.”

When they moved last summer, they changed their former four hour drive to a nine hour drive, but it was a wonderful opportunity for them—a promotion, greater salary, more responsibility. We encouraged them heartily to make the move, despite the greater difficulty in getting to see their boys. The older one, who is three, was our enthusiastic greeter. The younger one, eighteen months, was slower to warm up, but we devoted ourselves to giving him time to be reacquainted. We stored up hugs and story times and vowed to make the trip often, because it is important for grandchildren to know their legacy, to feel a part of a heritage greater than their immediate family.

Whenever we visit the grandchildren, and we have nine now, they want to hear family stories about when their parents were little. They know many of them (“Tell us about when Daddy set the forest on fire,” or, “Tell us about Dad’s pet duck.” Or the snake in the hen house or . . . .) And we connect them to their family history.

This is an important part of grand-parenting—beyond the unconditional love, we provide a legacy

 

After Christmas, What?
Monday, December 28, 2015
Charlotte S. Snead

The wrapping is thrown away. The scarves, socks and toys are put away, the turkey is going into the soup pot, but the laughter, the love, and the memories will linger until our eyes close in death, and beyond if we have laid hold of eternal life.

Jesus is more than the reason for the season. He is the Giver of Life itself, the Redeemer of all Who will trust in Him. He is joy, meaning, purpose and without Him everything is a shadow.

I pray everyone who reads this will know Him. The Westminster Catechism says, “The chief end of man is to glorify God and enjoy Him forever.” If you aren’t enjoying Him, you don’t know Him.

Let’s make our goal for 2016 to know Him more nearly, love Him more dearly, and share Him more clearly.

 

After Christmas, What?
Monday, December 28, 2015
Charlotte S. Snead

The wrapping is thrown away. The scarves, socks and toys are put away, the turkey is going into the soup pot, but the laughter, the love, and the memories will linger until our eyes close in death, and beyond if we have laid hold of eternal life.

Jesus is more than the reason for the season. He is the Giver of Life itself, the Redeemer of all Who will trust in Him. He is joy, meaning, purpose and without Him everything is a shadow.

I pray everyone who reads this will know Him. The Westminster Catechism says, “The chief end of man is to glorify God and enjoy Him forever.” If you aren’t enjoying Him, you don’t know Him.

Let’s make our goal for 2016 to know Him more nearly, love Him more dearly, and share Him more clearly.

 

Christmas Prioirities
Thursday, December 17, 2015
Charlotte S. Snead

The days are flying by, last minute mailing of packages to far-flung loved ones, going over the lists again and again, oops, whom did we forget? Pause.

I have been overwhelmed with thankfulness for the Incarnate Deity, that God created a human body to live in, so that he could be a perfect sacrifice for sin. That he chose to grow in a Mary’s womb, thus sanctifying motherhood. That he chose a human father, Joseph, the son of David, thus sanctifying fatherhood. Even the Son of God needed an earthly father.

So, should I feel guilty about mailing packages to my far-flung loved ones, creating our annual Christmas letter, complete with pictures, and having them printed? I have put personal notes on notes on each of them—I’m amazed how many people look forward to these year after year. We’ve seen a harvest from those letters and kept up with folks throughout the years.

During all this, I discovered one of my MOPS mothers, who has been abandoned with three children under six, was living in a house that is not grounded. I got our electrician over there and rounded up our church benevolence committee to approve the expenditure. When the electrician called the electric company to see about bringing a new line to the new box, they immediately shut off her electricity. Perhaps we have three precious children for Christmas this year instead of a tragic fire!

Oh, and I took dinner to a neighbor who recently had a hip replacement.

Maybe, by God’s grace, I’ve put hands and feet on Christ this Christmas. Happy birthday, Jesus.